Mold Treatment Services Oklahoma City OK

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Cypress Springs Alzheimer’s and Memory Support Residence - Oklahoma Ci
4052869500
8300 N. May Ave.
Oklahoma City, OK

Data Provided By:
Chet Lewis
A-Pro Services
(405) 284-6438
Rt 2 Box 154A
Oklahoma City, OK
 
Abel Garcia
A&E Roofing
405-326-0001
5728 NW 16
Oklahoma City, OK
 
Ronny Brannon
Ron Brannon Carpentry
214-882-0752
12801 steve dr.
okc, OK
 
Darin
McCoy Painting & Remodel
405-317-6344
3500 Duke Drive
Norman, OK
 
Paige Smiley
Bella Vici
(405) 306-4374
2614 NW 42nd St
Oklahoma City, OK
 
Denver Green
Saratoga Roofing & Construction
405-692-6100
208 NW 132nd Street
Oklahoma City, OK
 
Kirk Flowers
Affordable Pool Solutions LLC
(405) 802-1469
1914 Kirby Drive
Moore, OK
 
Warren Christy
Cedar Forest Fence Co.
405 219 4250
1700 Fawn Valley Ln.
Edmond, OK
 
Rusty Truck Remodel & Design
405.650.2800
2929 NW 11th St.
Oklahoma City, OK
Services
Paint, Interior Wall & Ceiling Painting, Interior Wall & Ceiling Faux Finishing, Furniture and Cabinent Painting and Glazing, Remodeling, Demo & Wall Removal, Wall Construction, Drywall Installation & Repair, Drywall Finishing & Texturing, Door Installation & Replacement, Tile Back splashes, Woodworking, Furniture/Cabinent Design & Fabrication, Woodwork Finishing & Refinishing, Flooring, Hard Woodm Hard Wood Refinishing, Laminate, Tile Setting, Concrete Staining
Licenses / Certifications
none
Awards
none
Membership Organizations
none
Years in Business
10

Data Provided By:

Threats to Indoor Air Quality

Contaminants and Their Impact on Health

Maintaining high indoor air quality, an important component of green building, becomes more complex as the number of chemicals used in household furnishings, products, and building materials continues to expand. Additionally, as houses become tighter, they are more likely to trap chemicals in the air we breathe.

  See Chapter 14 on  Indoor Air Quality Green from the Ground Up book for more details.

Contaminants in our homes fall into two broad categories:

Biological - originate indoors or outdoors and are known as bioaerosols and includes mold, dust mites, pollen, animal dander and bacteria. Chemical - includes both gases and particulates Biological Contaminants Mold

Mold grows on organic material, especially cellulose. The most common location for mold to grow is in the wall cavities of wet areas. Mold can come from outside sources, leaks in siding and housewrap or inside sources, like leaks in plumbing inside the walls. By the time you see evidence of mold, it has already grown into the wood or paper that supports it.

Where to Look for Mold

Mold and mildew may be found in the ductwork of your heating or cooling system. Sometimes they are found in the coils of an air conditioner,  in the connection between the air conditioner and the ductwork or on a dirty furnace and air-conditioning filters. Plumbing leaks and dampness in attics, basements, and crawlspaces can increase humidity inside your home and promote the growth of agents.

How to Prevent Mold

Mold can cause unsightly stains and may release varying levels of toxic chemicals called mycotoxins into the air. Keep moisture out of wall and ceiling cavities. Spray mold prevention coatings on the studs before the trades arrive.

Dust Mites

Dust mites and their waste are the most common allergens in indoor air. They live in rugs, carpets, sheets, mattresses, pillows and upholstered furniture. They can't be eliminated but reducing the amount of floor area covered by carpeting can help.

Chemical Contaminants

Every year, 700 new chemicals are introduced into the environment but less than 1% of them are tested for their impact on human health. Many of these end up in our homes in "new and improved" products.

Formaldehyde

Formaldehyde is a potent eye, upper respiratory and skin irritant. It off-gases for years leading to a number of potential health problems and is known to cause cancer in animals and is a suspected human carcinogen.  It is also one the most widely used adhesives in the construction industry. It is very common in wood products made with particleboard, such as cabinets, countertops and shelving.

Vinyl Chloride

You may not have seen vinyl chloride but you have smelled it - the smell of a new car, beach balls, and shower curtains. Vinyl chloride is not toxic when it is bonded into chains, such as PVC, but it is present as PVC is manufactured and often in its disposal, particula...

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