Green Roof Construction O Fallon MO

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Green Roof Construction. You will find informative articles about Green Roof Construction, including "Green Building Roofing". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in O Fallon, MO that can help answer your questions about Green Roof Construction.

GREEN ROOF BLOCKS
(314) 220-2113
10 Bay Oaks Court
Lake Saint Louis, MO
 
Green Roof Products (Green Roof Blocks)
(314) 220-2113
10 Bay Oaks Court
Lake Saint Louis, MO
 
GREEN ROOF BLOCKS
(314) 220-2113
10 Bay Oaks Court
Lake Saint Louis, MO
 
Huber Roofing
(636) 281-2239
2301 Highway Y
O Fallon, MO
 
R Myers Roofing & Concrete
(636) 240-9130
O Fallon, MO
 
Green Paks (Green Roof Blocks)
(314) 220-2113
10 Bay Oaks Court
Lake Saint Louis, MO
 
Green Roof Products (Green Roof Blocks)
(314) 220-2113
10 Bay Oaks Court
Lake Saint Louis, MO
 
Green Paks (Green Roof Blocks)
(314) 220-2113
10 Bay Oaks Court
Lake Saint Louis, MO
 
A & M Roofing & Construction Co
(636) 240-6612
1285 W Tiara
O Fallon, MO
 
K-Mac Roofing
(636) 561-2270
O Fallon, MO
 

Green Building Roofing

Green Roofing Resource

Roofing is a very important consideration in home building. It helps control the flow of air and moisture into the home and also insulates the home from extremes in temperatures. It is very climate specific and will provide years of service when installed correctly

See Chapter 6 on Roofing in the Green from the Ground Up book for more details or contact us about training .

What is a Green Roof?

Some roofs are literally green. Live vegetation can take the place of shingles, tile, or sheet metal. But one of the most important considerations for a sustainably built house is durability. The longer the roof lasts, the greener it is.

        Green Roofers’ Transition Guide

Use long life (40-50 year) shingles

Shingles are a petroleum based product, require a lot of energy to manufacture, and should be installed to last as long as possible.

Long life shingles will save the homeowner money on replacement and repair costs

These shingles are available from most manufactures

Specify recycled content materials

Recycled content asphalt shingles contain recycled waste paper and/or use reclaimed slag material in their aggregate surfaces. Discarded asphalt shingles are a major source of construction waste. Roofers should help keep them out of landfills by recycling them

Install concrete or clay tiles

Concrete or clay tiles are very hardy. They last a lifetime and require minimal maintenance in mild climates.

Check with a structural engineer to verify that the home can support this additional weight.

These roofing materials take more skill to install and cost more than asphalt shingles. Be aware that they can shatter in hail-prone areas

Install metal roofing

Metal roofing has a long life, its fire resistance and is highly reflectivity in light colors.

If available, install metal roofing with recycled content. Make sure it has no lead content.

More expensive than asphalt shingles, but a great green product as it can recycled at the end of its life.

Frame with Trusses

A raised-heel truss has added room at the eaves for insulation, good insurance against ice dams.

Substituting I-joists for wide dimensional lumber is a smart use of wood resources. I-joists provide equal or superior performance using less wood fiber and relieve pressure on remaining forest of big trees.

Use light color roofing to reflect summer sun

Light colored roofing reflects, rather than absorbs, heat from the sun. The result is a cooler home and reduced cooling bills. It lasts longer because it doesn’t expand and contract as much as dark colors. Check the Solar Reflectivity Index ratios (SRI) to see how well a product will reflect the sun.

Avoid flat roofs

Most flat roofing products are petroleum based, require a lot of energy to manufacture and install, and they have a relatively short life span.

A steep pitch discourages standing water, leakage, ice ...

Click here to read the rest of this article from GreenBuilding.com